Imaging

Before your test, your admission papers must be processed by the administrative team. On the day you arrive, you need to report to reception:

  • For imaging: at door D of the Eugène Marquis Centre.
  • For MRIs: at level -1 of door C of the Emergencies and Resuscitation Centre [Centre d’Urgence et de Réanimation] at Pontchaillou University Teaching Hospital
  • WHAT YOU NEED TO DO BEFORE THE EXAMINATION
    WHAT YOU NEED TO DO BEFORE THE EXAMINATION

    Documents to bring before your examination

    > Your ID card or passport
    > Your national health insurance card (Carte Vitale)
    > The prescription from your doctor
    > Your biology test results
    > Your results from any previous radiological examinations (CT scans, radiographs, etc.)

    You can eat and drink as normal and should take your usual medications, unless advised otherwise when booking your appointment.

    Bringing someone with you

    You can bring someone with you during your appointment. However, pregnant women and young children are advised not to come to the radiology department.

     

Having an MRI

The Eugène Marquis Centre shares an MRI machine with Pontchaillou University Teaching Hospital. It is on level -1 of door C of the University Hospital.

MRI stands for magnetic resonance imaging. “Magnetic” means that the machine contains a large magnet. “Resonance” means that it uses radio waves, like those in mobile phones, to make the hydrogen nuclei in your body vibrate. The machine produces cross-sectional images of the body, which are used to establish a diagnosis.

MRI testing is not radioactive and does not use x-rays.

  • SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
    SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

    Before undergoing any test and, if possible, at the moment you book your appointment, you should tell the staff if you are pregnant or breastfeeding or if your period is late. Your radiologist will decide whether or not to postpone the test, and you will be informed of any precautions that need to be taken.

    Except in certain cases, you should continue to take any medication that you are on as normal. If you need to stop taking it, you will be informed when your appointment is booked. If that occurs, please tell your doctor.

    If required and prescribed by your radiologist, a contrast agent may be injected into your bloodstream. Please let us know if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a contrast agent or if you have kidney problems.

    > Download the patient information leaflet – Using contrast agents in medical imaging

    As MRIs use a magnet, you must tell us if you have or have ever had:

    • > A heart attack
      > A heart valve replacement
      > Metal specks lodged in the eye
      > Clips in or around your brain
      > A recent implant or prosthesis

    We will ask you to remove all objects and clothes that contain metal so that they do not interfere with the magnet.

  • WHAT TO EXPECT DURING THE EXAMINATION
    WHAT TO EXPECT DURING THE EXAMINATION

    1. Welcome and preparation for the exam

    Please report first to our reception desk (door C of the Emergencies and Resuscitation Centre [Centre d’Urgence et de Réanimation] at Pontchaillou University Teaching Hospital) to register.

    The technician will take care of you and will check that there are no reasons why you cannot undergo the examination. If required, they will insert a venous line that will be used to inject the contrast agent.

    They will also ask you to remove all magnetic cards, mobile phones and other metal objects from your person and leave them in the booth. (All your belongings will be returned to you after the examination.)

     

    2. Getting into the machine

    The technician will help you lie down on the table of the MRI and will make sure you are as comfortable as possible.

     

    3. Taking the images

    During the examination, you will be alone in the room. The team will be nearby, behind a window. They will be able to see and hear you throughout the examination.

    You will be able to talk to them via a microphone. You will be given a bell to hold which you can use to call for attention if required. The examination can be paused or stopped at any time.

    To prevent blurry images, you will need to remain still throughout the examination. In some cases, the staff members will instruct you, via the communications system, to hold your breath for a few seconds.

    Pay close attention to all instructions; your cooperation is essential to prevent blurry images.

    The examination will last between 10 and 30 minutes, depending on the number of images required. It will not hurt, but the machine can be quite noisy.

  • AFTER THE EXAMINATION
    AFTER THE EXAMINATION

    Once your examination is complete, you can go back home. The images will be analysed by a radiologist from the department. A written report will be sent to your attending oncologist and your general practitioner as soon as possible.

    Please tell your care team if you experience anything strange once you have returned home.

Having an ultrasound

During an ultrasound, a transducer (probe) is used to transmit ultrasonic waves into your tissues. Your tissues reflect the waves, creating an image of the area. It can be coupled with a type of radar to examine your blood vessels (Doppler ultrasound).

Ultrasound is not radioactive and does not use x-rays.

  • SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
    SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

    Before undergoing any test and, if possible, at the moment you book your appointment, you should tell the staff if you are pregnant or breastfeeding or if your period is late. Your radiologist will decide whether or not to postpone the test, and you will be informed of any precautions that need to be taken.

    Except in certain cases, you should continue to take any medication that you are on as normal. If you need to stop taking it, you will be informed when your appointment is booked. If that occurs, please tell your doctor.

    If you are having an abdominal ultrasound, you will need to fast for at least three hours before your appointment, but you can continue to take your medications as normal.

    If you are having a pelvic ultrasound, you will need to have a full bladder before your appointment (drink a small bottle of water one hour beforehand). You can continue to take your usual medication.

    If required, you will be injected with a medically-prescribed intravenous contrast agent.
    > Download the patient information leaflet – Using contrast agents in medical imaging

  • WHAT TO EXPECT DURING THE EXAMINATION
    WHAT TO EXPECT DURING THE EXAMINATION

    1. Welcome and preparation for the exam

    Once you have registered at reception (door D), you will enter into the care of the radiologist and/or technician who will carry out the examination.

    Ultrasounds are performed on levels 0 and -1 of Building D of the Eugène Marquis Centre.

     

    2. Getting into the machine

    You will be asked to lie down on the examination table. To make it easier to view the images, the room will be darkened.

     

    3. Taking the images

    A gel will be applied to your skin to help transmit the ultrasound waves and produce the images.

    The examination usually takes between 15 and 30 minutes and does not hurt.

  • AFTER THE EXAMINATION
    AFTER THE EXAMINATION

    Once your examination is complete, you can go back home. The images will be analysed by a radiologist. A written report will be sent to your attending oncologist and your general practitioner as soon as possible.

    Please tell your care team if you experience anything strange once you have returned home.

Having a CT Scan

A CT scan examines the patient by using x-rays (invisible rays capable of crossing through the body, which are partially blocked by your tissues). The amount of x-rays absorbed by your tissues is measured.

The information gathered is used to create cross-sectional images of the body, which are helpful in establishing a diagnosis. The examination room is on level -1 of the Eugène Marquis Centre.

> Download the document:“Having a CT scan”

> Download the patient information leaflet on “Ionising rays and their medical uses”

  • SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
    SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

    Before undergoing any test and, if possible, at the moment you book your appointment, you should tell the staff if you are pregnant or breastfeeding or if your period is late. Your radiologist will decide whether or not to postpone the test, and you will be informed of any precautions that need to be taken.

    Except in certain cases, you should continue to take any medication that you are on as normal. If you need to stop taking it, you will be informed when your appointment is booked. If that occurs, please tell your doctor.

    If required and prescribed by your radiologist, a contrast agent may be injected into your bloodstream. Please let us know if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a contrast agent or if you have kidney problems.

  • WHAT TO EXPECT DURING THE EXAMINATION
    WHAT TO EXPECT DURING THE EXAMINATION

    1. Welcome and preparation for the exam

    You should go straight to the reception at door D to register.

    A technician will then take care of you and will check that there are no reasons why you cannot undergo the examination. If required, they will insert a venous line that will be used to inject the contrast agent.

     

    2. Getting into the machine

    The technician will help you lie down on the table of the x-ray machine and will make sure you are as comfortable as possible.

    If necessary, you will be asked to remove any clothing or jewellery from the area to be x-rayed.

     

    3. Taking the images

    During the examination, you will be alone in the room. The team will be nearby, behind a window. They will be able to see and hear you throughout the examination.

    They can talk to you via a microphone if required.

    The examination can be paused or stopped at any time.

    To prevent blurry images, you will need to remain still throughout the examination.

    In some cases, the staff members will instruct you, via the communications system, to hold your breath for a few seconds. Pay close attention to all instructions; your cooperation is essential to prevent blurry images.

    The examination will not hurt. It usually lasts between 10 and 20 minutes, depending on the number of images required.

  • AFTER THE EXAMINATION
    AFTER THE EXAMINATION

    Once your examination is complete, you can go back home. The images will be analysed by a radiologist from the department. A written report will be sent to your attending oncologist and your general practitioner as soon as possible.

    Please tell your care team if you experience anything strange once you have returned home.